Saturday, December 31, 2011

Patristics

The tree is made manifest by its fruit; so those that profess themselves to be Christians shall be recognized by their conduct. For there is not now a demand for mere profession, but that a man be found continuing in the power of faith to the end.” Ignatius, Ephesians, XIV, ANF 1:55

Baier's Axioms

Dic, ubi tunc esset, cum praeter eum nihil esset:
Tunc, ubi nunc, in se, quoniam sibi sufficit ipse.
Say, then where He might be, when beside Him nothing may exist:
Then, where [He is] now, in Himself, since He is sufficient in Himself.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th sacred

Gregory of Nazianzus, 329(?)-389(?)
- the last of the Cappadocians and a friend to the other two - was a better preacher than the others and a good writer - served in a number of different places, including being the bishop of Constantinople for a while (but was not enough of a politician to stay there long)

Friday, December 30, 2011

Luther quotes

Finally, we have before us one big, strong objection to answer. Yes, they say, it would be a fine thing to be married, but how will I support myself? …. What shall I say to this objection? It shows a lack of faith and out of God's goodness and truth. …. They trust in God as long as they know they do not need him, and that they are well supplied.” Martin Luther, Estate of Marriage, LW, AE, 45:47

Latin proverbs

Qui pro innocente dicit, satis est eloquens. (Pub. Syrus)
He who speaks for the innocent is eloquent enough.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th sacred

Gregory of Nyssa, 335-394
- Basil's younger brother, regarded as a better preacher and theologian, but not as good an administrator - is renowned as the most profound of the three Cappadocians - was bishop of the little town of Nyssa from 371-394

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Imitation of Christ

Habet magnum et salubre purgatorium homo patiens, qui suscipiens injurias, plus dolet de alterius malitia, quam de sua injuria, qui pro contrariantibus sibi libenter orat, et ex corde culpas indulget; qui veniam ab aliis petere non retardat, qui facilius miseretur quam irascitur, qui sibi ipsi violentiam frequenter facit, et carnem suam omnino spiritui subjugare conatur. Melius est modo purgare peccata, et vitia resecare, quam in futuro purganda reservare. Vere nos ipsos decipimus per inordinatum amorem, quem ad carnem habemus. 
   
The patient man has  a great opportunity of purifying his soul. When suffering injuries he grieves more for the other's malice than for his own wrong; when he prays heartily for those who work against  him, and forgives them from his heart; when he is not slow to ask pardon from others; when he is swifter to pity than to anger; when he frequently denies himself and strives altogether to subdue the flesh to the spirit. Better is it now to purify the soul from sin, than to cling to sins from which we must be purged hereafter. Truly we deceive ourselves by the inordinate love which we bear towards the flesh.

The Imitation of Christ, I, 24:2

Ecclesiasticus

"Pride was not created for men, nor fierce anger for those born of women." Ecclesiasticus 10:18

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th sacred

Basil of Caesarea (Basil the Great), 330-379
- one of the “Cappadocians” who became leading theologians along with Athanasius - born in Cappadocia (western Turkey), he became a proponent of monasticism (for people “serious” about Christianity) and Nicea
- in 370 he became the bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia and so was able to strengthen the Nicene cause significantly

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Patristics


And let those who are not found living as He taught, be understood to be no Christian, even though they profess with the lips the precepts of Christ; for not those who make profession, but those who do the works, shall be saved, ….” Justin Martyr, First Apology, XVI, ANF 1:168

Baier's Axioms


Enter, praesenter Deus hic et ubique potenter.
In essence, God is presently powerful here and everywhere.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th sacred


Athanasius of Alexandria, 295-373
- considered one of the great teachers or “doctors” of the church - at the synod of Nicea, he wasthe chief spokesman for the church of Alexandria, and for the view that Christ is 'homoousios,' that is, “of one substance” with the Father (whatever it was that made God god, the Son is “made” of the same stuff)
- becoming bishop of Alexandria, Athanasius was soon seen as the chief opponent of the Arians and since the Arians were influencing the emperor, Athanasius was exiled under Constantine (335-337 [Athanasius was accused of murdering a man and cutting off the man's hand to use in magic - Athanasius was able to produce the man, alive and unharmed, but he was exiled anyway]), Constantius (339-347 and 356-362), Julian (362-363), and Valens (365)
- when he died, Athanasius was greatly respected for having stood firmly for the faith regardless of all the pressure the emperor could bring to bear

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Luther quotes

Know therefore that marriage is an outward, bodily thing, like any other worldly undertaking. Just as I may eat, drink, sleep, walk, ride with, buy from, speak to, and deal with a heathen Jew, Turk, or heretic, so I may also marry and continue in wedlock with him.” Martin Luther, Estate of Marriage, LW, AE, 45:25

Latin proverbs

Semper inops quicumque cupit. (Claudian)
Whoever desires is always poor.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Magnus Maximus, 383-388
- took the throne because soldiers in Britain didn't like Gratian - was temporarily accepted as an emperor by Valentinian II and Theodosius - Theodosius eventually moved against him and he was defeated and executed
- was a devout Christian and began the practice of executing people for heresy and witchcraft (even though Martin of Tours and Ambrose of Milan protested, and Pope Siricus excommunicated those who had made accusations)

Monday, December 26, 2011

Imitation of Christ

In omnibus rebus respice finem, et qualiter ante districtum judicem stabis, cui nihil est occultum, qui muneribus non placatur, nec escusationes recipit, sed quod justum est, judicabit. O miserrime et insipiens, quid respondebis Deo, omniamala tua scienti, qui interdum times vultum hominis irati? Ut quid non prævides tibi in judicii die? Quando nemo poterit per alium excusari vel defendi, sed unusquisque sufficiens onus suum portabit sisi ipsi. Nunc labor tuus est fructuosus, fletus acceptabilies, gemitus exaudibilis, dolor satisfactorius et purgativus.



In all that you do, remember the end, and how you will stand before a strict judge, from whom nothing is hid, who is not bribed with gifts, nor accepts excuses, but will judge righteous judgment. O most miserable and foolish sinner, who are sometimes in fear of the countenance of an angry man, what will you answer to God, who knows all your misdeeds? Why do you not provide for yourself against the  day of judgment, when no man shall be able to be excused or defended by means of another, but each one shall bear his burden himself alone? Now does your labour bring forth fruit, now is your weeping acceptable, your groaning heard, your sorrow well pleasing to God, and cleansing to your soul.

Imitation of Christ, I, 24:1

Ecclesiasticus

"The beginning of man's pride is to depart from the Lord; his heart has forsaken his Maker. For the beginning of pride is sin, and the man who clings to it pours out abominations."  Ecclesiasticus 10:12-13

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Theodosius I, the Great, 379-395
- appointed emperor in the east after Adrianopole - tried to expel the Goths, but couldn't, so they were accepted as “federates,” allied nations living within the borders of the empire, living under their own laws and rulers
- in order to rebuild the army, it took money - Theodosius proclaimed in one law that “No man shall possess any property that is exempt from taxation.” - tenants could not leave their land; if they did they were “stealing” their own person from their landlord
- when Gratian was killed by Magnus Maximus, Theodosius gathered troops, and defeated him, and also defeated Arbogast, Valentinian II's killer - Theodosius only lived 5 more months
- was a devout Christian, perhaps too much so, for he felt it was his duty to persecute the pagans as they had earlier persecuted Christians - paganism was forbidden under threat of heavy penalties
- at Thessalonica in 390, a mob lynched a government official - Theodosius ordered that the army was to massacre several thousand citizens as a punishment - though Theodosius had countermanded the order (and so fewer people had died), Bishop Ambrose refused to give communion to the emperor until he had publicly done penance for the massacre (this, i.e., someone telling the emperor what he had to do, was literally unheard of)

Sunday, December 25, 2011

Patristics


For the coming into being at first was not in our own power; and in order that we may follow those things which please Him, choosing them by means of the rational faculties He has Himself endorsed us with, He both persuades us and leads to faith.” Justin Martyr, First Apology, X, ANF 1:165

Baier's Axioms


Unum nomen, una deitas.
One name, one deity.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular


Valentinian II, 375-392
- made co-emperor at his father's death, for years was under the influence and orders of others - after the defeat of Magnus Maximus, the real power in the West was the German Master of Soldiers, Arbogast - Valentinian tried to dismiss him and claim the power for his own, Arbogast refused to read the letter that fired him, and Valentinian was soon after found dead in his palace (it was believed that Arbogast had him killed)

Saturday, December 24, 2011

Luther quotes


What else is it but to sacrifice one's own child to an idol and burn it when parents train their children more in the love of the world then in love of God, and let their children go their own way and get burned up in worldly pleasure, love, enjoyment, lust, good, and honor, but let God's love and honor and love of eternal blessings be extinguished in them.” Martin Luther, Treatise on Good Works, LW, AE, 44:83

Latin proverbs

Cito fit, quod di volunt. (Petronius)
What the gods want happens quickly.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular


Gratian, 367-383
- son of Valentinian I, became co-Augustus at age 8, along with his 4 year old brother Valentinian II - most of his reign was political infighting to see who would control him -
appointed Theodosius to rule the East when Valens died
- was a pious Christian, greatly influenced by Ambrose of Milan - first emperor to refuse
the role of pontifex maximus (pagan 'high priest') - withdrew public funds from the support of paganism, and removed the pagan altar of Victory from the Senate house
- when Magnus Maximus revolted, his troops deserted him, jealous because of special
privileges given to German mercenaries, and he was later assassinated

Friday, December 23, 2011

Imitation of Christ

Serva te tanquam peregrinum et hospitem super terram, ad quem nihil spectat de mundi negociis. Serva cor liberum, et ad Deum sursum erectum, quia non habes hic manentem civitatem. Illuc gemitus et preces quotidianas cum lacrymis dirige, ut spiritus tuus mereatur post mortem ad Dominum feliciter transire. 

Keep yourself as a stranger and a pilgrim upon the earth, to whom the things of the world don't apply. Keep your heart free, and lifted up towards God, for here we have no continuing city. To Him direct your daily prayers with crying and tears, that your spirit may be found worthy to pass happily after death unto its Lord.

Imitation of Christ, I, 23:9

Ecclesiasticus

"Arrogance is hateful before the Lord and before men, and injustice is outrageous to both." Ecclesiasticus 10:7

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular


Valens, 364-378
- his brother made him emperor in the east, fought against the Goths and Persians
- in 376, Goths began moving - up till then, there had been two Gothic kingdoms, the Ostrogoths ('bright'/east Goths) centered in the Ukraine, and the Visigoths ('wise'/west
Goths) centered in Romania, but about that time the Huns came out of the east and
destroyed both kingdoms - 200,000+ Goths sought refuge in the empire
- when they were mistreated by corrupt officials, Goths began plundering the are (and killing Romans) - Valens hurried to fight them, fought a battle at Adrianopole, but the entire Roman army (and Valens) were destroyed
- had been a determined Arian, persecuting the Nicene faith

Thursday, December 22, 2011

Patristics


But we have received by tradition that God does not need the material offerings which man can give, seeing, indeed, that He Himself is the provider of all things. And we have been taught, and are convinced, and do believe, that He accepts those only who imitate the excellencies which reside in Him, temperance, and justice, and philanthropy, and as many virtues as are peculiar to a God who is called by no proper name.” Justin Martyr, First Apology, X, ANF 1:165

Baier's Axioms


Deus, si unus non est, non est. – `H poluqeÒthj stˆn ¢qeÒthj.
God, if He is not one, is not. – Polytheism is atheism.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular


Valentinian I, 364-375
- had been banished by Julian because he was a Christian - took over the west and made his brother Valens the emperor in the east (the empire remained divided from this time on) - took the west because of the dangers there - fought against the Alamanni on the Rhine, tried to get the Picts (Scotland) out of Britain
- in 375, a representative of a German tribe was so insolent to the emperor that, enraged, he burst a blood vessel and died
- strengthened the army and increased the status of soldiers - taxes were raised higher than ever, but appointed “Defenders of the People” to make sure the poor weren't oppressed
- in 367 raised his oldest son Gratian to be co-emperor - was Christian but fostered toleration for all religions

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Luther quotes


There is still another kind of dishonoring parents, much more dangerous and subtle than this first, a [dishonoring] which decks itself out and lets itself be regarded as a true honoring of parents. That is when a child has its own way and the parents allow it to do so out of natural love. In this case they honor one another and love one another. On all sides it is a precious thing; the mother and father are pleased and the child is pleased.
This plague is so common.....” ML, Treatise on Good Works, LW, AE, 44:82

Latin proverbs

Nobilitate caret si quis virtute caret. (Werner, adapt.)
If anyone lacks virtue, he lacks nobility.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular


Jovian, 363-364
- brought the army back from Mesopotamia after Julian died - repudiated Julian's paganism and restored the church to its favored position - was found dead in his bedroom (surprisingly, there were no rumors of foul play)

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Imitation of Christ

Ha stulte, quid cogitas te diu victurum, cum nullum diem habeas securum? Quam multi decepti sunt et insperati de corpore extracti! Quoties audisti a dicentibus, quia ille gladio cecidit, ille submersus est, ille ab alto ruens cervicem fregit, ille manducando obriguit, ille ludendo finem fecit, alius igne, alius ferro, alius peste, alius latrocinio interiit: et sic omnium finis mors est, et vita hominum tanquam umbra cito pertransit. 
 
Ah, foolish one! Why think that you will live long, when you are not sure of a single day? How many have been deceived, and suddenly have been snatched away from the body! How many times have you heard how one was slain by the sword, another was drowned, another falling from on high broke his neck, another died at the table, another whilst at play! One died by fire, another by the sword, another by the pestilence, another by the robber. Thus death comes to all, and the life of men swiftly passes away like a shadow.

Imitation of Christ, I, 23:7

Ecclesiasticus

"The government of the earth is in the hands of the Lord, and over it he will raise up the right man for the time." Ecclesiasticus 10:4

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Julian, the Apostate, 361-363
- his tutor gave him a love for the classics, the murder of his family made him unhappy with Christianity - was made Caesar in 355, defeated the Franks and Alamanni in Gaul, wasvery popular, a good administrator
- openly declared himself to be a pagan - deprived the church of its privileges, and Christians were excluded from teaching (which was based on the pagan Greek classics) - he encouraged disunity in the church
- attempted to reorganize paganism along the lines of Christianity, but was resisted by the  pagans - attempted to rebuild the Temple but “miraculously” was stopped - wounded in a skirmish against the Persians and never recovered

Monday, December 19, 2011

Patristics

We must beware, however, lest anyone should suppose that gross sins, such as are committed by those who shall not inherit the kingdom of God, maybe daily perpetuated, and daily atoned for by almsgiving. So life must be changed for the better; and almsgiving must be used to propitiate God for past sins, not to purchase impunity for the commission of such sins in the future. For He has given no man license to sin,....” Augustine ,Enchiridion, LXX, NPNF1, 3:260

Baier's Axioms

Quaecunque de Deo dicimus, oÙ t¾n fÚsin, ¢ll¦ t¦ perˆ t¾n fÚsin insinuant.
Whatever we say about God, makes known, not His nature, but the things concerning His nature.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Constantius II, 337-361
- was rumored that he was behind the murder of his relatives - after fighting against Magnentius, made another cousin, Julian, the Caesar in the west
- did support Arians, made the church a part of government - was believed to be jealous of Julian, who declared himself Augustus - on the way to fight Julian, Constantius caught a fever and died

Sunday, December 18, 2011

Luther quotes

By the same token, hell is no more easily earned than with respect to one's children. You could do no more disastrous work then to spoil the children, let them curse and swear, let them learn profane words and vulgar songs and just let them do as they please. …. There is no greater tragedy in Christendom than spoiling children. If we want to help Christendom, we most certainly have to start with children, as happened in earlier times.” Martin Luther,  A Sermon on the Estate of Marriage, LW, AE, 44:12-13

Latin proverbs

Ut ver dat florem, studium sic reddit honorem. (Med.)
As spring brings flowers, so study brings honors.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Magnentius, 350-353
- claimed to be restoring liberty to the western part of the empire - eventually fought against Constantius II at Mursa and was defeated (the first battle in which legions were routed by heavy cavalry) - 54,000 men were reported to have died on that day, crippling the army for a long while

Saturday, December 17, 2011

Imitation of Christ

Noli confidere super amicos et proximos, nec in futuris salutem tuam differas, quia citius obliviscentur tui homines, quam existimas. Melius est nunc tempestive providere et aliquid boni præmittere, quam super aliorum auxilio sperare. Si non es pro te ipso sollicitus modo, quis erit sollicitus pro te in futuro. Nunc tempus est valde prætiosum, sed proh dolor, quod hoc inutilius expendis, in quo promereri vales, unde æternaliter vivas. Veniet quando unam diem seu horam pro emendatione desiderabis, et nescio, an impetrabis. 

Trust not your friends and kinsfolk, nor put off the work of your salvation to the future, for men will forget you sooner than you think. It is better for you now to provide in time, and to send some good before you, than to trust to the help of others. If you are not anxious for yourself now, who do you think will be anxious for you later? Now the time is most precious. Now is the accepted time, now is the day of salvation. But, alas, that you do not spend well this time, wherein you might lay up treasure which could profit you everlastingly. The hour will come when you will desire one day, yea, one hour, for amendment of life, and I know not whether you will obtain it.
Imitation of Christ, I, 23:5

Ecclesiasticus

"A wise magistrate will educate his people, and the rule of an understanding man will be well ordered." Ecclesiasticus 10:1

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Constans, 337-350
- the big difference between Constans and Constantius was that Constans was a Nicene, Constantius an Arian - endowed the churchs and monasteries liberally, gave favors to the clergy
- took action against the Donatists, defeated the Franks and the tribes on the Danube - visited Britain (343), the last emperor to do so - wasn't popular witih the troops, so a former slave of Constantine, Magnentius, led a rebellion and Constans was killed

Friday, December 16, 2011

Patristics

But He who said, 'I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy,' loved Jacob of His undeserved grace, and hated Esau of His deserved judgment.” Augustine, Enchiridion, XCVIII, NPNF1, 3:268

Baier's Axioms

Facilius, quid non sit, quam quid sit Deus, explicatur.
It is easier to explain what God is not than to explain what He is.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Constantine II, 337-340
- declared Caesar in 317 while still an infant - one of the three sons of Constantine who inherited the empire (after killing their cousins) - one of the first acts was to have Constantine declared a god by the Roman senate - tried to take over Italy (where his brother Constans ruled), was ambushed and killed

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Luther quotes

But this at least all married people should know, they can do no better work and do nothing more valuable either for God, for Christendom, for all the world, for themselves, and for their children then to bring up their children well.” Martin Luther, A Sermon on the Estate of Marriage, LW, AE, 44:12

Latin proverbs

Ibi semper est victoria ubi concordia est. (Pub. Syrus)
Where there is co-operation there is always victory.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Maximinus Daia, 310-313
- was Diocletian's choice for Augustus in the east - continued Diocletian's persecution with greater severity - everyone, including infants, had to attend public sacrifice, eat some of the sacrificial animal, and be sprinkled with the blood - tried to turn paganism into something like the church
- fought against Licinus, outnumbered him 2-1 yet still lost - escaped and “punished” the pagan priest who had predicted his victory by rescinding the laws against the church and restoring the church's property

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Imitation of Christ

Cum mane fuerit, puta te ad vesperum non perventurum. Vespere autem facto, mane non audeas tibi polliceri. Semper ergo paratus esto, et taliter vive, ut nunquam imparatum te mors inveniant. Multi subito improvisi moriuntur. Nam hora, qua non putatur, Filius hominis veniet. Quando hora illa extrema venerit, multum aliter sentire incipies de tota vita tua præterita et valde dolebis, quia tam negligens, et remissus fuisti.

When it is morning reflect that it may be that you will not see the evening, and at eventide dare not to boast of the morrow. Always be prepared, and so live that death may never find you unprepared. Many die suddenly and unexpectedly. For at such an hour as you do not plan, the Son of Man comes. When that last hour shall come, you wilt begin to think very differently of your whole life past, and will mourn bitterly that you hast been so negligent and slothful.
Imitation of Christ, I, 23:3

Ecclesiasticus

"A work will be praised for the skill of the craftsman; so a people's leader is proved wise by his words. A babbler is feared in his city, and the man who is  reckless in speech will be hated." Ecclesiasticus 9:17-18

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Licinus, 308-324
- Augustus in 308, allied with Constantine in 313 - when he fought against Constantine, he had more troops, but was defeated - captured and imprisoned, later executed for continuing to plot against Constantine

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Patristics

For it seems unjust that, in the absence of any merit or demerit, from good over evil works, God should love the one and hate the other. Now, if the apostle had wished us to understand that there were future good works of the one, and evil works of the other, which of course God foreknew, he would never have said, 'not of works,' but, 'of future works,' and in this way would have solved the difficulty, or rather there would then have been no difficulty to solve.” Augustine, Enchiridion, XCVIII, NPNF1, 3:268

Baier's Axioms

Attributa divina de se mutuo possunt praedicari in abstracto, quatenus sunt in Deo, non autem quatenus sunt in nostris conceptibus.
Divine attributes are not able to be predicated reciprocally in abstraction, insofar as they are in God, however not insofar as they are in our conception.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Constantine the Great, 306-337
- son of Constantius Chlorus and Helena (an innkeeper's daughter) - acclaimed as Augutus by his troops - when Galerius died, it was open war between him and Maxentius
- Battle of Milvian Bridge, 312 - outnumbered 4-1, Constantine defeated Maxentius and his troops and Maxentius died in the retreat - Constantine claimed to have seen a vision from the Christian God, a cross and In hoc signo vinces (“In this sign you will conquer”)
- this victory made Constantine the sole Augustus in the west - in 323 there was war between him and Licinus to see who would be sole ruler (Constantine won in 324)
- continued the reorganization of the army with more German troops in the army, higher taxes, more bureaucracy and more strict laws to pay for the army - set up a new capital city, Constantinople (Constantine's city - closer to the Danube and the Persian frontier)
- 311, Edict of Serdica, freedom of religion granted to Christians - Constantine began moving the state toward being a “Christian” empire - “chaired” the council of Arelate (314) and Niceae (325) - apparently saw Christianity as a unifying force in the empire
- 326, suspicious of treason, ordered the death of his wife and oldest son - baptized on his death

Monday, December 12, 2011

Luther quotes

Those who want to enter the estate of marriage should learn from this that they should earnestly pray to God for a spouse.” Martin Luther, A Sermon on the Estate of Marriage, LW, AE, 44:8

Latin proverbs

Litterae non dant panem. (Medieval)
Litterature earns no bread.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Maxentius, 306-312
- son of Maximinus, Diocletian's partner - supported by the old praetorian guard - Galerius tried to remove him, but the soldiers wouldn't fight - was declared a “public enemy” in 308, but was able to sustain himself in power until he died in battle against Constantine in 312

Sunday, December 11, 2011

Imitation of Christ

Quid prodest diu vivere, quando parum emendamur? Ha, longa vita non semper emendat, sed sæpe culpam magis auget. Utinam per unam diem bene essemus conversati in hoc mundo. Multi annos computant conversionis, sed sæpe parvus est fructus emendationis. Si formidolosum est mori, forsitan periculosius erit vivere diu. Beatus qui horam mortis suæ semper ante oculos habet, et ad moriendum quotidie se disponit. Si vidisti aliquem mori, cogita quia tu per eandem viam transibis. 


What does it profit to live long, when we amend so little? Ah! long life does not always amend, but often the more increases guilt. Oh that we might spend a single day in this world as it ought to be spent! Many there are who reckon the years since they were converted, and yet oftentimes how little is the fruit thereof. If it is a fearful thing to die, it may be perchance a yet more fearful thing to live long. Happy is the man who has the hour of his death always before his eyes, and daily prepares himself to die. If you have ever seen one die, consider that you also will pass away by the same road.

Imitation of Christ, I, 23:2

Ecclesiasticus

"Let righteous men be your dinner companions, and let your glorying be in the fear of the Lord." Ecclesiasticus 9:16

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Galerius, 305-311
- was “junior” Caesar, then junior Augustus, but more powerful (the east was wealthier) - fought on the Danube and Persian frontier - he strongly influenced Diocletiain, especially in terms of persecution of the church (Diocletian had been tolerant, but Galerius' mother was a fanatical pagan)
- his fourth edict against the church insisted that every Christian had to offer pagan sacrifice
- in 311 became sick and on his death bed revoked the persecution and asked the church to pray for him

Saturday, December 10, 2011

Patristics

Then let us also love the prophets, because they too have proclaim the gospel, and place their hope in Him, and waited for Him; in whom also be leaving, they were saved, through union to Jesus Christ, being holy man, worthy of love and administration, having had witness borne to them by Jesus Christ, and being reckoned along with [us] in the Gospel of the common hope.” Ignatius, Philadelphians, V, ANF 1:82

Baier's Axioms

Condescendit nobis Deus, ut nos consurgamus.
God descends to us, so that we might rise.

Murphysboro Centuries, 4th secular

Constantius I Chlorus, 305-306
- had been the “senior” Caesar in Diocletian's setup, in charge of Gaul(France) and Britain - when Diocletian abdicated he became the senior Augustus, but died soon after that

Friday, December 9, 2011

Luther quotes

As to divorce, it is still a question for debate whether it is allowable. For my part I so greatly detest divorce that I should prefer bigamy to it; but whether it is allowable, I do not venture to decide.” Martin Luther, Babylonian Captivity, LW, AE, 40:105

Latin proverbs

Homines, dum docent, discunt. (Seneca)
While men teach they learn.

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd sacred

Gregory the Wonder-worker, d. c. 275
- first bishop of Pontus (northern Turkey) and was responsible for converting most of the province - many stories are told about the miracles he supposedly performed

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Imitation of Christ

Valde cito erit tecum hoc factum: vide aliter quomodo te habeas. Hodie homo est, et cras non comparet. Cum autem sublatus fuerit ab oculis, etiam cito transit a mente. O hebetudo, et duritia cordis humani, quod solum præsentia meditatur, et futura non magis prævidet. Sic te in omni facto et cogitatu deberes tenere, quasi statim esses moriturus. Si bonam conscientiam haberes, non multum mortem timeres. Melius esset peccata cavere quam mortem fugure. Si hodie non es paratus, quomodo cras eris? Cras est dies incerta, et quid scis si crastinum habebis?



Very quickly will there be an end of you here; take heed therefore how it will be with you in another world. Today man is, and tomorrow he will be seen no more. And being removed out of sight, quickly also he is out of mind. O the dulness and hardness of man's heart, which thinks only of the present, and looks not forward to the future. You ought in every deed and thought so to order yourself, as if you were to die this day. If you had a good conscience you would not greatly fear death. It were better for you to watch against sin, than to fly from death. If today you are not ready, how will you be ready tomorrow? Tomorrow is an uncertain day; and how do you know that you will have a tomorrow?

Imitation of Christ, I, 23:1

Ecclesiasticus

"As much as you can, aim to know your neighbors, and consult with the wise. Let your conversation be with men of understanding, and let all your discussion be about the law of the Most High." Ecclesiasticus 9:14-15

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd sacred

Dionysius the Great, bishop from 248-265
- one of the first “great” bishops of Alexandria, very powerful over a large area - wrote a tremendous amount, but not much survived the persecutions

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Patristics

All these, therefore, were highly honored, and made great, not for their own sake, or for their own works, or for the righteousness which they wrought, but through the operation of His will. And we, too, being called by His will in Christ Jesus, are not justified by ourselves, nor by our own wisdom, or understanding, or godliness, or works which we have wrought in holiness of heart; but I have faith through which, from the beginning, Almighty God has justified all men; to whom be glory for ever and ever.” 1 Clement, XXXII, ANF 1:13

Baier's Axioms

Nihil est in Deo, quod non sit ipse Deus.
Nothing is in God, which is not God Himself.

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd sacred

Cyprian, c. 200-258
- bishop of Carthage, Africa - best known for insisting on the baptism of infants at an early time ( 'eight days too long to wait'), and for insisting on the unity of the church
- there was only one church and there was no salvation outside the church - if you were not part of the church, you were not a Christian - the unity of the church was based on the unity of the bishops

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

Luther quotes

Nor would I agree to that impediment which they call 'disparity of religion,' which forbid someone to marry an unbaptized person, either simply, or on condition that she be converted to the faith. Who made this prohibition? God or man? Who gave to man the power to prohibit such a marriage.” Martin Luther, Babylonian Captivity, LW, AE, 40:100

Latin proverbs

Mulier, cum sola cogitat, male cogitat. (Pub. Syrus)
When a woman plans by herself, she does a poor job of it.

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd sacred

Hippolytus of Rome, d. 235
- claimed to be a student of Irenaeus, was first “anti-pope” - wrote a lot, but best known for his work about what worship was like at that time in Rome - died in the mines

Monday, December 5, 2011

Imitation of Christ

Dicunt multi imbecilles et infirmi, Ecce quam bonam vitam ille homo habet, quam dives et quam magnus, quam potens et excelsus. Sed attende ad cælestia bona, et videbis quod omnia ista temporalia nulla sunt, sed magis incerta, et valde gravantia, quia nunquam sine solicitudine, et timore possidentur. Non est hominis felicitas habere temporalia ad abundantiam, et sufficit ei mediocritas. Vere miseria est vivere super terram. Quanto homo voluerit esse spiritualior, tanto præfens vita sit ei amarior, quia sentit melius, videt clarius humanæ corruptionis affectus. Nam comedere, bibere, vigilare, dormire, quiescere laborare et cæteris necessitatibus naturæ subjacere vere magna miseria est, et afflictio homini devoto, qui libenter esset absolutus et liber ab omni peccato. 

 
There are many foolish and unstable men who say, "See what a prosperous life that man has, how rich and how great he is, how powerful, how exalted." But lift up your eyes to the good things of heaven, and you will see that all these worldly things are nothing, they are utterly uncertain, yes, they are wearisome, because they are never possessed without care and fear. The happiness of man lies not in the abundance of temporal things but a moderate portion suffices him. Our life upon the earth is verily wretchedness. The more a man desires to be spiritual, the more bitter does the present life become to him; because he understands and sees better the defects of human corruption. For to eat, to drink, to watch, to sleep, to rest, to labor, and to be subject to the other necessities of nature, is truly a great wretchedness and affliction to a devout man, who would rather be released and free from all sin.

Imitation of Christ, I, 22:2

Ecclesiasticus

"Do not envy the honors of a sinner, for you do not know what his end will be. Do not delight in what pleases the ungodly; remember that they will not be held guiltless as long as they live." Ecclesiasticus  9:11-12

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd sacred

Origen, c. 185-254
- philosopher and educator in Alexandria, Egypt - regarded by some as the first great systematic theologian - best known for his enthusiasm for allegory which held that every part of Scripture has at least three meanings (flesh, soul, spirit meanings) - spiritual meanings may have absolutely nothing to do with the 'flesh' or literal meaning - was seen as a “great writer” because a wealthy patron paid to have his works copied and distributed

Sunday, December 4, 2011

Patristics


Let us then, men and brethren, with all energy act the part of soldiers, in accordance with His holy commandments. Let us consider those who serve under our generals, with what order, obedience, and submissiveness they perform the things which are commanded them.” 1 Clement, XXXVII, ANF 1:15

Baier's Axioms


In Deum non cadit accidens. – In Deo nihil est mutabile vel amissibile.
In God accidents don't happen. – In God nothing is changeable or lose-able.

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd sacred


Tertullian, c. 155-212
- writer in Rome and Africa - had been a lawyer and became a Christian c. 190-195 - began writing in 197 - was the first to write using Latin - in Africa, persecution under Septimus Severus led him to sympathize with Montanists - finally started his own little church
- saw Christianity through the eyes of Greek philosophy (Stoicism) - saw Christianity as knowledge about God, a new law - taught original sin, but not clearly - sin is forgiven by God's grace and baptism wipes out sin, but if one sins after baptism, you have to pay for that sin - punishing yourself will pay for that sin and God will punish you less

Saturday, December 3, 2011

Luther quotes

The papists and Anabaptists teach: If you wish to know Christ, try to be alone, don't associate with men, become a separatist. This is plainly diabolical advice which is in conflict with the first and second table [of the Decalogue]. The first table requires faith and fear [of God]. According to the second commandment, this is to be preached and publicly praised before men and is to be discussed among men. One must not flee into a corner. So the {141} second table teaches that one must do good to one's neighbor. We ought not to isolate ourselves but enter into companionship with our neighbor.” ML, Tabletalk, Schlaginhaufen #1329, between 1/8 and 3/23, 1532, LW, AE, 54:140

Latin proverbs

Homo semper aliud, Fortuna aliud cogitat. (Pub. Syrus)
Man always plans one thing and Fortune another.

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd secular

Maximian, 268-305, 307-308 AD
- co-Augustus with Diocletian with his main responsibility in the West - forced to retire by Diocletian, but didn't like it and tried to come back, but Diocletian came out of retirement long enough to force Maximian to retire again

Friday, December 2, 2011

Stromata

Watching all the news about the debt crises in the US and Europe, it struck me (with my very basic understanding of economics), that there was a simple answer to it all - simple, but unlikely to ever be adopted. 

The problem seems to be one of unsecured debt - all these nations spending more than they take in, and no "collateral" that could be seized in case of default.



But isn't there a possible source of  "collateral" in state museums? How much collateral for otherwise unsecured debts and bonds could be provided by the Mona Lisa (Louvre), the bust of Nefertiti (Egyptian Museum of Berlin), or the Mask of Agamemnon (National Archaeology Museum of Athens)?


It would seem to me that using such items as "collateral" would remove a lot of uncertainty from world markets, but I can't see national governments agreeing to such a thing.

Imitation of Christ

O quanta fragilitas humana, quæ semper prona est ad vitia. Hodie confiteris peccata tua, et cras iterum perpetras confessa. Nunc proponis cavere, et post horam ita agis, quasi nihil proposuisses. Merito ergo nosmetipsos humiliare possumus, nec unquam aliquid magni de nobis sentire, quia tam fragiles et instabiles sumus. Cito etiam potest perdi per negligentiam, quod multo labore vix tandem acquisitum est per gratiam. 
 
O how great is the frailty of man, which is ever prone to evil! Today you confess your sins, and tomorrow you again commit the sins you confessed. Now you resolve to avoid a fault, and within an hour you behave yourself as if you had never resolved at all. Good cause have we therefore to humble ourselves, and never to think highly of ourselves, seeing that we are so frail and unstable. And quickly may that be lost by our negligence, which by much labour was hardly attained through grace.

Imitation of Christ, I, 22:6

Ecclesiasticus

"Forsake not an old friend, for a new one does not compare with him. A new friend is like new wine; when it has aged you will drink it with pleasure." Ecclesiastes 9:10

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd secular


Diocletian, 284-305 AD
- set up the “Tetrarchy”, 2 Augusti, 2 Caesars, with responsibilities evenly spread out to all four - they would rise to power by ability - he was the most impressive organizer since Augustus
- doubled the number of provinces (so they would be too small for the governors to make a successful revolt), grouped them in larger “dioceses” - vastly increased the army and made big changes with static forces on the borders and a mobile reserve
- because of this, there was a huge rise in taxes and inflation went wild - he issued a degree trying to regulate prices and wages but it was a spectacular failure
- in 303, even though his wife was a Christian, tried to stamp out Christianity - (1) no assemblies of Christians, (2) churches and Bibles were to be burned, and (3) clergy  (later also laypeople) were arrested, imprisoned and tortured/executed if they wouldn't make a pagan sacrifice
- abdicated peacefully in 305, died in 316 (the only emperor to “retire” from that job)

Thursday, December 1, 2011

Patristics

For though I am alive while I write to you, yet I am eager to die. My love has been crucified, and there is no fire in me desiring to be fed; but there is within me a water that liveth and speaketh, saying to me inwardly, Come to the Father.” Ignatius, Romans, VII, ANF 1:76-77

Baier's Axioms

Est essentia Dei tÕ p©n kaˆ oÙdšn.
The essence of God is the everything and the nothing.

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd secular

Carinus, 283-285 AD
- son of Carus, co-emperor with his brother Numerian - claimed victories over the Germans and Britons

Numerian, 283-284 AD
- in charge in the East, but not much of a general and didn't want to fight - he started for home and was killed by his second-in-command


Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Luther quote


For to suffer wrong destroys no man's soul, in fact it improves the soul, though it does inflict hurt to our body and possessions. But to do wrong destroys the soul, even though all the world's wealth be gained.” Martin Luther, Treatise on Good Works, LW, AE, 44:92

Latin proverb

Astra regunt homines, sed regit astra Deus. (Anon.)
The stars rule men, but God rules the stars.

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd secular


Probus, 276-282 AD
- defeated most of the German invaders, but the soldiers though they were worked too hard and were unappreciated, so they deserted him and he was killed

Carus, 282-283 AD
- defeated the Germans on the Danube, and defeated the Persians, but was found dead in his tent one night


Monday, November 28, 2011

Imitation of Christ

Miser es ubicumque fueris, et quocumque te verteris, nisi ad Deum te convertas. Quid turbaris quia non succedit tibi sicut vis et desideras? Quis est qui habeat omnia secundum suam voluntatem? Nec ego, nec tu, nec aliquis hominum super terram. Nemo est in mundo sine aliqua tribulatione, vel angustia, quivis Rex, vel Papa. Quis est, qui melius habet? Utique qui pro Deo aliquid pati valet.
 
You are miserable wheresoever you are, and wherever you turn, unless you turn to God. Why are you disquieted because things don't happen to you according to your wishes and desires? Who is he that has everything according to his will? Neither I, nor you, nor any man upon the earth. There is no man in the world free from trouble or anguish, though he were King or Pope. Who is he who has the happiest lot? Even he who is strong to suffer somewhat for God.

Imitation of Christ, I, 22:1

Ecclesiasticus

"Do not consult with a fool, for he will not be able to keep a secret." Ecclesiasticus 8:17

Murphysboro Centuries, 3rd secular

Tacitus, 275-276 AD
- fought against the Goths, died after about 8 months from fever

Florian, 276 AD
- declared himself emperor (without waiting for the soldiers or the Senate to proclaim him), killed by his own soldiers


Saturday, November 26, 2011

Patristics

True knowledge is [that which consists in] the doctrine of the apostles, and the ancient constitution of the Church throughout all the world, and the distinctive manifestation of the body of Christ according to the successions of the bishops, by which they have handed down that Church which exists in every place, and has come even unto us, being guarded and preserved, without any forging of Scriptures, by a very complete system of doctrine, and neither receiving edition nor [suffering] curtailment [in the truths which she believes]; and [it consists in] reading [the word of God] without falsification, and a lawful and diligent exposition in harmony with the Scriptures, both without danger and without blasphemy; and [above all, it consists in] the pre-eminent gift of love, which is more precious than knowledge, more glorious than prophecy, and which excels all the other gifts [of God].” Irenaeus, Against Heresies, IV, 33:8, ANF, 1:508

Baier's Axioms

Praesentem monstrat quaelibet herba Deum.
The green plants everywhere demonstrate the [ever-]present God.