Thursday, May 31, 2012

Imitation of Christ

Possunt quidem verba sonare, sed spiritum non conferunt. Pulcherrime dicunt, sed te tacente cor non accedunt. Litteras tradunt, sed tu sensum aperis. Mysteria referunt, sed tu referas intellectum signatorum. Mandata edunt, sed tu juvas ad perficiendum. Viam ostendunt, sed tu confortas ad ambulandum. Illi foris tantum agunt, sed tu corda instruis, et illuminas. Illi exterius rigant, sed tu fecunditatem donas. Illi clamant verbis, sed tu auditui intelligentiam tribuis.



They [Moses and the prophets] can indeed utter words, but they give not the spirit. They speak with exceeding beauty, but when You are silent they kindle not the heart. They give us scriptures, but You make known the sense thereof. They bring us mysteries, but You reveal the things which are signified. They utter commandments, but You help in the fulfilling of them. They show the way, but You give strength for the journey. They act only outwardly, but You instruct and enlighten the heart. They water, but You give the increase. They cry with words, but You give understanding to the hearer.

Imitation of Christ, III, 2:2

Ecclesiasticus

"He [God] set his eye upon their hearts to show them [man] the majesty of his works." Ecclesiasticus 17:9

Latin proverbs


Crudelitatis mater est avaritia. (Quintilian)
Greed is the mother of cruelty.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Alfonso VIII, 1158-1214
- beaten by Moslems in 1195, Castile was invaded by Leon and Navarre - beat them back and began the process of unifying all of Spain against the Moslems

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Patristics


“Tiberius accordingly, in whose days the Christian name made its entry into the world, having himself received intelligence from Palestine of events which had clearly shown the truth of Christ's divinity, brought the matter before the Senate, with his own decision in favor of Christ. The Senate, because it had not given the approval itself, rejected his proposal. Caesar held to his opinions, threatening wrath against all accusers of the Christians.” Tertullian, Apology, 5, ANF 3: 21-22

Baier's axioms


Fides per quodvis peccatum mortale excutitur et amittitur.
Faith, through whatever mortal sin you wish, is driven out and sent away.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Spain

Alfonso VII, 1126-1157
- crowned “emperor in 1135, worked hard to advance the reconquest and drive out the Moslems


Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Luther


“For Christ established the sacrament on himself and not on the person of the minister. It rests on the Word. Accordingly, when there is a confession of the Word, no matter what kind of knave the minister may be, this detracts not at all from the sacrament.” Martin Luther, Tabletalk, Deitrich, #574, Summer/Fall 1533, LW, AE, 54:101

Latin proverbs


Hominis tota vita nihil aliud quam ad mortem iter est. (Seneca)
The whole life of man is nothing else than a joumey to death.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Philip II, “Augustus”, 1180-1223
- the outstanding king of his time - “founder of the organized state” (he started regular taxes and a bureacracy) and the “maker of Paris” - spent the first part of his reign putting down revolts and increasing his power - in 1191 joined Richard of England on the 3rd Crusade, but quarreled with him and returned home.

Monday, May 28, 2012

Imitation of Christ

Animadverte hoc, o anima mea, et claude sensualitatis tuæ ostia, ut possis audire quid loquatur Deus Dominus in te. Hæc dicit dilectus tuus. Salus tua ego sum, pax tua, et vita tua. Serva te apud me, et pacem invenies. Dimitte omnia transitoria, et quære æterna. Quid sunt omnia temporalia, nisi seductoria et quid juvant omnes creaturæ, si fueris a Creatore deserta? Omnibus ergo abdicatis Creatori tuo te redde placitam et fidelem, ut veram valeas apprehendere beatitudinem.



Think on these things, O my soul, and shut the doors of your carnal desires, so you may hear what the Lord God will say within you. These things your Beloved says, "I am your salvation, I am your peace and life. Keep with Me, and you will find peace." Put away all transitory things, seek those things that are eternal. For what are all temporal things but deceits, and what shall all created things help you if you are forsaken by the Creator? Therefore put all things else away, and give yourself to the Creator, to be well pleasing and faithful to Him, that you may be able to attain true blessedness.


Imitation of Christ, III, 1:2

Ecclesiasticus

"He [God] made for them [man] tongue and eyes; he gave them ears and a mind for thinking. He filled them with knowledge and understanding, and showed them good and evil." Ecclesiasticus 17:6-7

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Louis VII, “the Young”, 1137-1180
- not a strong king, but pious - in 1147, he inspired the 2nd Crusade - returned, beaten, two years later to all sorts of problems - his marriage to Eleanor of Acquitaine annulled in 1152 (she quickly married Henry II of England, which gave Henry more power in France than Louis)
- 1170, the “masters” (teachers) of Paris were recognized as a group, marking the beginning of the University of Paris

Sunday, May 27, 2012

Patristics


“…, you exhibit the violence and unjust domination of mere tyranny, if you deny a thing to be lawful, simply on the ground that you wish it to be unlawful, not because it ought to be.” Tertullian, Apology, 4, ANF 3:21

Baier's axioms


Omne peccatum, etiam minimum et cordiale, etiam in regenitis, natura sua et per se est mortale, legalitur. – Omne peccatum, etiam maximum, evangelice ex parte Dei est veniale. – Omne peccatum in irregenitis, etiam minimum, est actu mortiferum.

Every sin, even the smallest and from the heart, even in the reborn, by its nature and in itself is mortal, legally. – Every sin, even the greatest, evangelically on the part of God is forgivable. – Every sin in the unregenerate, even the smallest, is by act death-bringing.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


France

Louis VI, “the Fat”, 1108-1137
- brave soldier, very popular - tried hard to reduce the power of the nobles - by granting charters  (permission to form towns/cities) he began the process of developing cities, which started growing for the first time in 7-8 centuries - kings had relied on their nobles, Louis began the practice of getting help from lesser nobles and the middle class

Saturday, May 26, 2012

Luther


“Further we note how seldom the Evangelists and Apostles make mention of the Eucharist, a fact that has led many to wish they had said more about it. On the other hand, they ceaselessly emphasize, even to the point of weariness, the ministry of the Word.” Martin Luther, Concerning the Ministry, LW, AE, 40:28

Latin proverbs


Calamitas virtutis occasio est. (Seneca)
Disaster is an opportunity for bravery.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Henry VI, 1190-1197
- the German “empire” was at its height - he captured Richard of England on his way back from the crusade and extracted a huge ransom for his release - his sudden death led to 14 years of civil war in Germany

Friday, May 25, 2012

Imitation of Christ

Tota vita Christi crux fuit, et martyrium, et tu tibi quæris reqiuem, et gaudium? Erras, erras si aliud quæris quam pati tribulationes, quia tota ista vita mortalis plena est miseriis, et circumsignata crucibus. Et quanto quis altius in spiritu profecerit, tanto gravioes cruces sæpe inveniet, quia exilii sui pœna magis ex amore crescit.



The whole life of Christ was a cross and martyrdom, and do you seek rest and joy for yourself? You are wrong, you are wrong, if you seek anything but to suffer tribulations, for this whole mortal life is full of miseries, and set round with crosses. And the higher a man has advanced in the spirit, the heavier crosses he will often find, because the sorrow of his banishment increases with the strength of his love.

Imitation of Christ, II, 12:7

Ecclesiasticus

"He placed the fear of them [mankind] in the living beings, and granted them dominion over beasts and birds." Ecclesiasticus 17:4

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Frederick I, “Barbarossa” (Red Beard), 1152-1190
- the leaders were so worried after the anarchy that Conrad had left behind that they selected the strongest man in Germany to have some stability - well educated, Barbarossa felt he was continuing in the style of the great emperors of the past (Constantine, Justinian, Charlemagne)
- he began the practice of calling his “empire” the ‘Holy Roman Empire’ - because of past troubles with the pope, he got rid of all reformers in his lands, making sure that the bishops were his strong supporters
- he led many military campaigns into Italy to try and ensure his rights (to the land in northern Italy) - in 1186 he went on the 3rd Crusade, which he led until his death

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Patristics


“What are we to think of it, that most people so blindly knock their heads against the hatred of the Christian name; that when they bear favorable testimony to any one, they mingle it with abuse of the name he bears? 'A good man,' one says, 'is Gaius Seius, only that he is a Christian.' So another, 'I am astonished that a wise man like Lucius should have suddenly become a Christian.' Nobody thinks it needful to consider whether Gaius is not good and Lucius wise, on this very account that he is a Christian; or a Christian, for the reason that he is wise and good. They praise what they know, they abuse but they are ignorant of, and they inspire their knowledge with their ignorance; ….” Tertullian, Apology, 3, ANF 3:20

Baier's axioms


Ignoranti facti minuit peccatum et excusat a certa specie peccati, non a peccato omni.
Ignorance of the deed diminishes the sin and excuses certain types of sin, [but] not from all sins.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Conrad III, 1138-1152
- the bishops again interfered, ignoring the Welf heir apparent and electing Conrad (Hohenstaufen) - he was a gallant knight, but not a statesman - went on the Second Crusade, and returned to find Germany in total confusion
- it was during his reign that the German princes started their “Drang nach Osten”, their eastward movement against the Slavs (similar to the US westward movement west against the Indians)

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Luther


“You must always fight against the devil and all his works with humility, and yet at the same time maintain a bold faith. And if that is no help, then do without the sacrament, the altar, the priest, and t he church, because the Word of God condemned in the bull is far more than all the rest put together. The soul cannot do without the Word of God, but it can do quite well without sacraments.” Martin Luther, An Instruction to Penitents, LW, AE, 44:226-7

Latin proverbs


Religio vera est firmamentum rei publicae. (Plato, trans.)
Real religion is the foundation of the state.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Lothair II, 1125-1137
- the bishops of Germany, after all the fighting that had been going on with the pope, decided that it would be a bad thing to elect Henry’s closest relative (Frederick of Swabia, of the house of Hohenstaufen), so they elected Lothair of Saxony (of the house of Welf)
- Lothair ruled well and pacified the country, but this set in motion a continuing battle, in Germany and Italy, between the two rival houses, Hohenstaufen and Welf (or the Ghibilline and Guelf as they were known in Italy)

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Credis tu evadere, quod nemo mortalium potuit præterire? Quis Sanctorum in mundo sine cruce et tribulatione fuit? Nec enim Dominus noster Jesus Christus una hora sine dolore passionis fuit, quamdiu vixit. Opertebat autem Christum pati, et resurgere a mortuis, et ita intrare in gloriam suam. Et quomodo tu aliam viam crucem quæris, quam hanc regiam, quæ est via sanctæ crucis.



Do you think to escape what no mortal has been able to avoid? Which of the saints in the world have been without the cross and tribulation? For not even Jesus Christ our Lord was one hour without the anguish of His Passion, so long as He lived. It is proper, He said, for Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead, and so enter into his glory. And how do you seek another way than this royal way, which is the way of the Holy Cross?

Imitation of Christ, II, 12:6

Ecclesiasticus

"He [God] to men few days, a limited time, but granted them authority over the things upon the earth. He endowed them with strength like his own, and make them in his own image." Ecclesiasticus 17:2-3

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Germany

Henry V, 1106-1125
- married to Matilda of England - gathered his power and when he went to Italy, took a big army with him, and Pope Paschal offered to solve the ‘investiture’ problem by giving up all secular holdings (which other church leaders objected to, strongly)
- 1115, Matilda, Countess of Tuscany (northern Italy) died, leaving her lands to Henry (till that time she had been letting the Pope use her land), setting up further reasons for the Pope and the German king to fight

Monday, May 21, 2012

Patristics


“Those, then, who run down created existence and vilify the body are wrong; not considering that the frame of man was formed erect for the contemplation of heaven, and that the organization of the senses tends to knowledge; and that the members and parts are arranged for good, not for pleasure.” Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4:26, ANF 2:439

Baier's axioms


Justus in omni bono opere peccant.
The righteous sins in every good work.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Richard I, 1189-1199, “the Lion-hearted”
- the greatest of medieval knights, one of the worst English kings - he only visited England twice, in order to raise money - was captured and held for ransom on his way home from the Third Crusade, and taxes were raised very high to pay for his ransom 
- his brother John “Lackland” had control of some of the counties during this period - this is the time of Robin (Hood), Earl of Locksley

Sunday, May 20, 2012

Luther


“If then that which is greatest, namely Word and baptism, is conferred on all, then it can be rightly maintained that the lesser, the power to consecrate, is also conferred, even if there be no direct authority of Scripture.” Martin Luther, Concerning the Ministry, LW, AE, 40:25

Latin proverbs


Homines amplius oculis quam auribus credunt. (Seneca)
Men trust their eyes more than their ears.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Henry II, 1154-1189
- first king of the “Plantagenet” house, ruled over an “empire”, England and a large part of France (controlled more of France than the French king did) - educated, vigorous, with a violent temper
- the big problem during his reign was “benefit of clergy” - during Stephen’s reign, it became the custom that clergy (and anyone who could read was entitled to be called clergy) could only be tried in church courts, not the royal courts, regardless of the crime
- the king “fought” with his good friend Thomas Becket over this matter - Tomas had been made archbishop of Canterbury by Henry, and Henry was surprised to find that Thomas took the church’s side - one day when Henry was really upset, he was overheard to ask why no one could get rid of this annoying archbishop, and four knights who wanted to get in good with the king went and murdered Thomas Becket in the church
- also during Henry’s reign, the first permanent central court was established and English Common Law (good for the whole realm) began to be developed (that’s the law system the US has), which included using juries to decide the facts of cases, and the presumption of innocent until proven guilty
- in 1167, Oxford University was founded

Saturday, May 19, 2012

Imitation of Christ

Si libenter crucem portas, portabit te, et deducet te ad desideratum finem, ubi scilicet finis patiendi erit. Si invite portas, onus tibi facis, et te ipsum magis gravas, et tamen oportet ut sustineas. Si abjicis unam crucem, aliam proculdubio invenies, et forsitan graviorem.



If you willingly bear the Cross, it will bear you, and will bring you to the end which you seek, even where there will be the end of suffering; though it will not be here. If you bear it unwillingly, you make a burden for yourself and greatly increase your load, and yet you must bear it. If you cast away one cross, without doubt you will find another and maybe a heavier one.

Imitation of Christ, II, 12:5

Ecclesiasticus

"After this the Lord looked upon the earth, and filled it with his good things; with all kinds of living beings he covered its surface, and to it they returned." Ecclesiastes 16:29-30

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


Stephen, 1135-1154
- nephew of Henry I, who took the throne even though Henry’s daughter, Matilda (married Germany’s Henry V), was supposed to inherit - the war between then lasted for 20 years and wrecked English prosperity - eventually a compromise was reached that Matilda’s son would inherit after Stephen

Friday, May 18, 2012

Patristics


“But punishment does not avail to him who has sinned, to undo his sin, but that he may sin no more, and that no one else fall into the like.” Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4:24, ANF 2:438

Baier's axioms


Quaedam sunt per se peccata quaedam vero kat' ¥llo, propter aliud.
Certain things are sins in themselves {per se}, certain things truly [are sins] according to another, on account of another.

Murphysboro Centuries, 12th secular


England

Henry I, 1100-1135
- good ruler, on taking throne, promised to return to the “good old ways” of William the Conqueror - married an Anglo-Saxon princess and tried to bring the two nationalities together
- during his reign the royal courts and administration were  strengthened - the land prospered under his rule - in 1106, he took Normandy from his brother Robert - this eventually led to a long struggle with the French king over the control of Normandy

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Luther


“Therefore, the second work of this commandment ['You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain'] is to be on one's guard, to flee from and avoid all temporal honor and praise, and never to seek a name for oneself, or fame and a great reputation, so that everyone may sing your praises and talk about you. This is an exceedingly dangerous sin, yet the most common of all, and unfortunately too little attention is paid to it.” Martin Luther, Treatise on Good Works, LW, AE, 44:42

Latin proverbs


Imponit finem sapiens et rebus honestis. (Juvenal)
The wise man puts a limit on even honorable undertakings.

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th sacred


The Beginning of Scholasticism


Realism - the categories that we use (dog, cat, table) are real, and the things we see are only reflections of those “real” things
Nominalism - the categories that we use are only “names” and reflect how we categorize the things we see

Anselm of Canterbury, d. 1109
- selected, then exiled by William Rufus - he brought Aristotelian logic into the study of religion, for good and bad - “Anselm ... deserves recognition for having saved Christianity from irrationalism and the absurdity of illogical and self-contradictory suppositions. For example there were Christian spokesman who, ..., said he [God] could do anything, such as change the past, make a square circle, or fashion a finite stick without ends.”

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Imitation of Christ

 Interdum a Deo relinqueris, interdum a proximo exercitaberis, et quod amplius est sæpe tibimetipsi gravis eris. Nec tamen aliquo remedio vel solatio liberari seu alleviari poteris, sed donec Deus voluerit, oportet ut sustineas. Vult enim Deus ut tribulationem sine consolatione discas pati, et illi totaliter te subjicias et humilior ex tribulatione fias. Nemo ita cordialiter sentit passionem Christi, sicut is cui contigerit similia pati. Crux igitur semper parata est, et ubique te exspectat. Non potes effugere ubicumque cucurreris, quia ubicumque veneris, temetipsum tecum portas, et semper te ipsum invenies. Converte te supra, converte te infra, converte te extra et intra, et in his omnibus invenies crucem, et necese est te ubicumque tenere patientiam, si internam vis habere pacem et perpetuam promereri coronam.



Sometimes you will be forsaken of God, sometimes you will be tried by your neighbor, and what is more, you will often be wearisome to yourself. And still you cannot be delivered nor eased by any remedy or consolation, but must bear so long as God wills. For God will have you learn to suffer tribulation without
consolation, and to submit yourself fully to it, and by tribulation be made more humble. No man understands the Passion of Christ in his heart so well as he who has had somewhat of the like suffering himself. The Cross therefore is always ready, and everywhere waits for you. You cannot flee from it wherever you hurry, for wherever you go, you bear yourself with you, and will always find yourself. Turn yourself above, turn  yourself  below, turn  yourself  without, turn  yourself  within, and in them all you will find the Cross; and needful is it that you everywhere possess patience if you will have internal peace and gain the everlasting crown.

Imitation of Christ, II, 12:4

Ecclesiasticus

"The works of the Lord have existed from the beginning by his creation, and when he made them, he determined their divisions. He arranged his works in an eternal order, and their dominion for all generations, they neither hunger nor grow weary, and they do not cease from their labors." Ecclesiasticus 16:26-27

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th sacred


Robert of Champagne
- founded a monastery at Citeaux because he believed that Cluny had become too lax, too easy- going - the discipline was more severe, the life harder in this house and it became the first monastic house of the Cistercian order

Ivo of Chartres, 1040-1146
- at a time when things seemed pretty lawless and arbitrary, Ivo began the formulation of “canon law” - church law that specified what the church was supposed to do in certain situations

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Patristics


“The adversary is not the body, as some would have it, but the devil, and those assimilated to him, who walks along with us in the person of men, who emulate his deeds in this earthly life.” Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4:14, ANF 2:426

Baier's axioms


Quales primi parentes erant post lapsum corpore et anima, tales procreati sunt omnes..
Of what sort the first parents were after the fall in body and mind, of that sort are all the offspring.

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th sacred


The High Point of Monasticism


Beginning with the founding of the monastery of Cluny in 910, the drive to reform the church and the morals of Europe, was centered in the various monastic orders

Robert of Arbrissel
- on orders of Urban II began traveling about Europe preaching - he eventually settled near Paris and founded a monastic house at Fontevrault  

Monday, May 14, 2012

Luther


“He who has chosen poverty ought not to be rich. If he wants to be rich, let him put his hand to the plow and seek his fortune from the land. It is enough if the poor are decently cared for so that they do not die of hunger or cold. It is not fitting that one man should live in idleness on another's labor, or be rich and live comfortably at the cost of another's hardship, ….” Martin Luther, To the Christian Nobility, LW, AE, 44:190

Latin proverbs


Bonus vir nemo est nisi qui bonus est omnibus. (Pub. Syrus)
No one is a good man unless one who is good to all.

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th sacred


The Investiture Controversy


By this time the church was wealthy (i.e. owned a lot of land) and in most of Europe was a powerful force in politics - because of this the various kings had been appointing their own friends and followers to these positions of power, regardless of their ability to be pastors or bishops - in some cases people who were outright pagans were “made” into Christian bishops because some powerful political person wanted a friend to have more influence.

Pope Gregory VII, 1074-1085
- had been known as Hildebrand for many years, a statesman and diplomat, a reformer of the church, the chief advisor to 6 popes, and the one who actually personally chose three of them
- in 1073 the Roman people insisted that he actually be the pope, rather than just working behind the scenes (and he wasn’t even a priest at the time) 
- in reforming the church Gregory passed two decrees - the first saying that there was to be no simony, and any person who bought his office was unworthy of it and would lose their position - also anyone guilty of fornication (sex before marriage) was to be immediately kicked out of their position - it shows the state of the church that the bishops of both France and Germany ridiculed this ‘decree’ as being “absurd” and said that “nobody could conform to
them even if he wanted to”
- in a second decree Gregory said that anyone who received his office from a layman (something that kings and princes were doing) would no longer be considered a clergyman - in France and England this was disturbing and there were problems between the royalty and the pope
- in Germany the king depended on those important bishops as his most important supporters, so it came down to a major fight between Gregory VII and Henry IV - when Henry ignored the
pope’s decree, Gregory deposed the king and proclaimed an “interdict” (a prohibition of anything religious for any area under Henry’s control)
- after “pretending” to repent, Henry solved the problem by leading his army against Gregory, and Gregory eventually had to flee - but under a later pope, an agreement was reached with all the kings of Europe that the church would select the bishops, though the king could refuse to place all the wealth and power in their hands if they did not want to (which in effect meant that it had to be someone the king could accept)

Sunday, May 13, 2012

Imitation of Christ

 Ecce in cruce totum jacet, et non est alia via ad vitam, et ad veram et internam pacem, nisi via sanctæ crucis, et quotidianæ mortificationis. Ambula ubi vis, quære quodcumque volueris, et non invenies altiorem viam supra, nec securiorem infra, nisi viam sanctæ crucis. Dispone et ordina omnia secundum velle tuum et videre,et non invenies, nisi semper aliquid pati debere aut sponte aut invite et ita crucem semper invenies. Aut enim in corpore dolorem senties, aut in anima spiritus tribulationem sustinebis.



Behold everything depends upon the Cross, and everything lies in dying; and there is none other way unto life and to true inward peace, except the way of the Holy Cross and of daily mortification. Go where you will, seek whatsoever you will, and you will find no higher way above nor safer way below, than the way of the Holy Cross. Dispose and order all things according to your own will and judgment, and you will always find something to suffer either willingly or unwillingly, and thus you will always find your cross. For you will either feel pain of body, or tribulation of spirit within your soul.

Imitation of Christ, II, 12:3

Ecclesiasticus

"Do not say, 'I shall be hidden from the Lord, and who from on high will remember me? Among so many people I shall not be known, for what is my soul in the boundless creation?' .... This is what one devoid of understanding thinks; a senseless and misguided man thinks foolishly." Ecclesiasticus 16:17, 23

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th sacred


Patriarch Michael Cerulaius, 1043-1058
- a learned professor in Constantinople, he so impressed the people that there were plots around to make him the emperor - instead he became the Patriarch and wanted to insure that the Patriarch of Constantinople was regarded as the equal of the Pope of Rome
- the Pope wanted to maintain his claim as being ‘supreme’ because he was the bishop of Rome, the original capitol of the empire - the Patriarch wanted to maintain his claim of equality with the Pope because he was the bishops of Constantinople, the “New Rome”

In 1054, after quite a bit of arguing between east and west, papal representatives excommunicated and condemned Michael Cerulaius. A few days after that Michael Cerulaius and his followers excommunicated and condemned Pope Leo IX. While Michael was pleased at his independence, some historians have suggested that this helped contribute to the destruction of the Byzantine empire.


Saturday, May 12, 2012

Patristics


“But nothing is without the will of the Lord of the universe. It remains to say that such things happen without the prevention of God; for this alone saves both the providence and the goodness of God. We must not therefore think that He actively produces afflictions (far be it that we should think this!); but we must be persuaded that He does not prevent those that cause them, but overrules for good the crimes of His enemies:....” Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4:12, ANF 2:424

Baier's axioms


Deus saepe ea jubet, quae vult in nobis efficere, et sua in nobis opera coronat et remuneratur.
God often orders those things which he wishes to effect in us, and he crowns and rewards his works in us.

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th sacred


Pope Leo IX, 1049-1054
- a reformer of the church who tried to get rid of simony (buying church positions) and lay control over the church - (kings and princes had appointed whoever they wanted to be in church positions even if they weren’t Christians, and regularly sold offices to the highest bidder)
- led his own troops to fight against the Normans who were invading southern Italy
- he also released Edward the Confessor from a vow but made him start building a chapel that has become Westminster Cathedral
- he also received King MacBeth of Scotland and after his confession, forgave his sin

Friday, May 11, 2012

Luther


“If your enemy needs you and you do not help him when you can it is the same as if you had stolen what belonged to him, for you owe him your help. St. Ambrose says, 'Feed the hungry: if you do not feed him, then as far as you are concerned, you have killed him.'” Martin Luther, Treatise on Good Works, LW, AE, 44:109

Latin proverbs


Solitudo placet Musis, urbs est inimica poetis. (Petrarch)
Solitude pleases the Muses; the city is unfriendly to poets.

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th secular


The First Crusade


Because of too many warriors and too much warfare in Western Europe, and because the Turks had won at Manzikert and were pushing the Byzantines out of their lands, Pope Urban in 1095 preached that the Holy Places (Jerusalem, Bethlehem, etc.) needed to be freed from the Moslems so that Christian pilgrims could safely travel there - this Crusade included a promise of forgiveness of sins if you gave your life in service to God - news of this spread like wildfire all across Europe - five great mass movements of people began moving east, all of which were eventually annihilated when they encountered armed forces - about 30,000 French noblemen and knights did make their way to the East, were passed on by Alexius Comnenus to Asia to fight against the Moslems - because the Moslems were not united (they were feuding amongst themselves), the French were able to set up the Crusader Kingdoms, western outposts in the Middle East

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Imitation of Christ

Quid igitur times tollere crucem, per quam itur ad Regnum? In cruce salus. In cruce vita. In cruce protectio ab hostibus. In cruce robur mentis. In cruce gaudium spiritus. In cruce virtus summa. In cruce perfectio sanctitatis. Non est salus animae, nec spes æternæ vitæ, nisi in cruce. Tolle ergo crucem et sequere Jesum, et ibis in vitam æternam. Præcessit ille bajulans sibi crucem, et mortuus est pro te in cruce, ut tu etiam portes crucem, et mori affectes in cruce. Quia, si commortuus fueris in cruce, etiam cum illo pariter vives, et si socius fueris pœ, socius eris et gloriæ.



Why do you fear then to take up the cross which leads to a kingdom? In the Cross is health, in the Cross is life, in the Cross is protection from enemies, in the Cross is heavenly sweetness, in the Cross strength of mind, in the Cross joy of the spirit, in the Cross the height of virtue, in the Cross perfection of holiness. There is no health of the soul, no hope of eternal life, save in the Cross. Take up therefore, your cross and follow Jesus and you will go into eternal life. He went before you bearing His Cross and died for you upon the Cross, that you also may bear your cross and may love to be crucified upon it. For if you be dead with Him, you will also live with Him, and if you be a partaker of His sufferings you will be also of His glory.

Imitation of Christ, II, 12:2

Ecclesiasticus

"The sinner will not escape with his plunder, and the patience of the godly will not be frustrated." Ecclesiasticus 16:13

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th secular


Alexius I Comenus, 1081-1118
- one of the great Byzantine emperors - fought against the Normans, who, having taken Italy, were trying to take over the rest of the Byzantine land - was emperor during the time of the First Crusade

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Patristics


“It is also unmanly and weak to shun living with a wife and children. For of that of which the loss is an evil, the possession is by all means a good; and this is the case with the rest of things. But the loss of children is, they say, among the chiefest evils; the possession of children is consequently a good thing; and if it be so, so also is marriage.” Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2:23, ANF 2:378

Baier's axioms


A praecepto ad posse N{on} V{alet} C{onsequentia}
From the commandment to the possibility [of keeping the commandment] is not a valid conclusion.

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th secular


Romanus IV Diogenes, 1068-1071
- in 1068, the Byzantines lost, to the Normans who were invading Italy, the last of their cities, held since Justinian’s days - in 1071 he fought and lost (because of the treason of some of his officers) the battle of Manzikert (one of the great battles of history) - because of the treason, the battle was lost - because the battle was lost the Turks were able to raid and devastate the area that is now called Turkey - it had been the center of Byzantine power and income, a rich, heavily populated and Christian area - loss of the battle led to it being turned into a wasteland which was eventually taken over by the Moslem Turks

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Luther


“God grant us all that we may practice what we preach, putting our words into deeds. There are many among us who say, 'Lord, Lord' [Matt. 7:21], and praise the teaching, but the doing and following are simply not there.” Martin Luther, Sincere Admonition to All Christians, LW, AE, 45:74

Latin proverbs


lmmodicis brevis est aetas et rara senectus. (Martial)
For the intemperate, youth is short and old age is unusual.

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th secular


Theodora, 1042-1056
- older sister of Zoe, popular and good ruler, but already old when she began to rule - during her reign the Great Schism happened - in 1054, the Roman Pope and the Constantinoplitan Patriarch each excommunicated and condemned each other - the division remained in effect until the 1980’s

Monday, May 7, 2012

Imitation of Christ

O, quantum potest amor Jesu purus, nullo propio commodo vel amore permixtus. Nonne omnes mercenarii sunt dicendi, qui consolationes semper quærunt? Nonne amatores sui magis quam Jesu probantur qui sua commoda vel lucra semper meditantur? Ubi invenitur talis, qui velit servire Deo gratis?



Oh what power the pure love of Jesus has, unmixed with any gain or love of self! Should not all they be called mercenary who are always seeking consolations? Do they not prove themselves lovers of self more than of Christ who are always seeking their own gain and advantage? Where shall be found one who is willing to serve God altogether freely?

Imitation of Christ, II, 11:3

Ecclesiasticus

"As great as his mercy, so great is also his reproof; he judges a man according to his deeds." Ecclesiasticus 16:12

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th secular


Constantius IX, 1042-1050
- scholar who neglected the army and defense of the nation

Sunday, May 6, 2012

Patristics


“But continual and successive repentings for sins differ nothing from the case of those who have not believed at all, except only in their consciousness that they do sin.” Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2:13, ANF 2:360

Baier's axioms


Voluntas Adami interpres erat voluntatum omnium omnino eorum, qui in lumbis vel femore ejus erant.
The will of Adam was the interpreter of all the wills of all of those who were in his loins or thighs.

Murphysboro Centuries,, 11th secular


Michael IV, 1034-1041
- mostly worked to make his family wealthy and powerful

Saturday, May 5, 2012

Luther


“But it is the way of Christians to judge according to faith. Therefore, in obeying commandments nothing else should be regarded than the form of the precept and the intention of him who commands. No regard should be paid to whether the works are trivial or important, worthless or worthwhile, many or few, of a short or a long duration, or of whatever form they take or whatever name they bear. For it is not the work as such which God commands, but obedience in the work, or, as Scripture expresses it, 'Obedience not sacrifice.'” Martin Luther, Judgment of Martin Luther on Monastic Vows, LW, AE, 44:349

Latin proverbs


Ingratus unus omnibus miseris nocet. (Pub. Syrus)
One ungrateful person hurts the cause of all those who need help.

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th secular


Romanus III,1028-1034
- under him a Christian sect in Syria was heavily persecuted, which led them to welcome the Turks when their invasion came


Friday, May 4, 2012

Imitation of Christ

Qui autem Jesum propter Jesum, et non propter aliquam suam consolationem propriam diligunt, ipsum in tribulatione, et in angustia cordis, sicut in summa consolatione diligunt, et benedicunt. Et si eis consolationem nunquam dare vellet, ipsum tamen laudarent, et semper gratias agere vellent. 


But they who love Jesus for Jesus' sake, and not for any consolation of their own, bless Him in all tribulation and anguish of heart as in the highest consolation. And if He should never give them consolation, nevertheless they would always praise Him and always give Him thanks.

Imitation of Christ, II, 11:2

Ecclesiasticus

"Even if there is only one stiff-necked person, it will be a wonder if he remains unpunished. For mercy and wrath are with the Lord; he is mighty to forgive, and he pours out wrath." Ecclesiastes 16:11

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th secular


Byzantium

Constantine VIII, 1025-1028


Zoe, 1028-1050
- daughter of Constantine, husbands became emperors

Thursday, May 3, 2012

Patristics


For he that repents of what he did, no longer does or says as he did.” Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2:12, ANF 2:360

Baier's axioms


Liberum arbitrium post peccatum res est de solo titulo, et dum facit, quod se in est, peccat mortaliter.
Freedom of the will after sin is a thing only about a title, and while it does what is in itself, it sins mortally.

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th secular

Yaroslav the Wise, 1019-1054
    - the kingdom of Russian Kiev reaches its high point under him


Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Luther quotes


Good works, however, or, to give them their proper name, the fruits of faith, do not really pertain to the remission of sins and a serene conscience, but are the fruits of forgiveness already granted and still present, as well as of a good conscience.” Martin Luther, Judgment of Martin Luther on Monastic Vows, LW, AE, 44:279

Latin proverbs

Suum cuique pulchrum est. (Cicero)
To each one his own is beautiful.

Murphysboroo Centuries, 11th secular

Russia

Vladimir the Saint, 980-1015
- under him the Russian state (capital of Kiev) converted to Eastern Orthodoxy

Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Imitation of Christ

Habet autem Jesus multos amatores sui regnis cælestis, sed paucos bajulatores suæ crucis. Plures invenit socios mensæ sed paucos abstinentiæ. Omnes volunt cum Christo gaudere, sed pauci volunt aliquid pro ipso sustinere. Multi sequuntur Jesum usque as fractionem panis, sed pauci ad bibendum calicem passionis. Multi miracula ejus venerantur, sed pauci ignominias crucis sequuntur. Multi Jesum diligunt, quamdiu adversa non contingunt. Multi illum laudant et benedicunt, quamdiu consolationes aliquas ab ipso recipiunt. Si autem Jesus se abscondiderit, et modicum eos reliquerit, aut in querimoniam aut in dejectionem nimiam cadunt.


Jesus has many lovers of His heavenly kingdom, but few bearers of  His Cross. He has many seekers of comfort, but few of tribulation. He finds many companions of His table, but few of His fasting. All desire to rejoice with Him, few are willing to undergo anything for His sake. Many follow Jesus that they may eat of His loaves, but few that they may drink of the cup of His passion. Many are astonished at His Miracles, few follow after the shame of His Cross. Many love Jesus so long as no adversities happen to them. Many praise Him and bless Him, so long as they receive any comforts from Him. But if Jesus hide Himself and withdraw from them a little while, they fall either into complaining or into too great dejection of mind.

Imitation of Christ, II, 11:1

Ecclesiasticus

"For through one man of understanding a city will be filled with people, but through a tribe of lawless men it will be made desolate." Ecclesiasticus 16:4

Murphysboro Centuries, 11th secular


Spain

Part of the country ruled by a number of different small Moslem kings

Alfonso VI of Castile, 1072-1109
- very active in fighting against the Moslems, attempting to drive them back to Africa - during his reign El Cid (Rodrigo Diaz de Bivar) became renowned as a warrior in fighting against the Moslems - in later Spanish mythology he was viewed as almost single-handedly driving the Moslems out of Spain [in reality El Cid fought on the side of the Moslems almost as much as he fought against them]